My English☆私の英語

Hi, this is Shire! Welcome back to my room♪

The English edition of 【ELB-7 : Reincarnation/Dimensional operation, part 1】was just posted on the New Beth’s Blog! It covers the subject of “reincarnation” entirely which should be pretty interesting to check out. I was really interested in how the people who visited/stayed in Japan became “Jomonean” – the people acquire the characteristic of Jomon-jin naturally no matter where your origin/race belongs to. It should be really fun to find out some different ideas about reincarnation!

While I was working on this translation project, I’ve noticed that many English phrases I felt comfortable to use were somehow labeled as “old English.” Old? How come it could even happen?! In this physical world, I am a Japanese native and have been in the US for more than 20 years so that my English should be 120% “modern” American-English (at least that’s what I thought of speaking).

However, I started noticing that many idiomatic phrases I’ve been feeling comfortable to use for the translation were used more often in Britain/England and/or said “old English” in a couple of dictionaries. For example, “I held the flower in my hand like as if I was lost my mind.” — you know, the phrase “like as” is an old English which I thought it was just a regular phrase.

As I wrote this entry before, I was taking an English speaking class in Shamballa which I did practice Queen’s English while my physical body was sleeping. In fact, my colleagues at work (in the physical world) pointed out that I have a slight British accent with some specific words. All right, there are some visible & interesting changes here. However, I could not figure out where my “old English” expressions were coming from.

Then, I was told that people in Shamballa do speak/write in rather old English (Their former official language, German was also used the older expressions as well). I didn’t notice it at all since I usually do initiate a conversation via telepathy (not using my physical mouth). However, I can no longer deny the strong influence of Shamballa by such a rather undeceivable way.

Of course, I (in the physical world) get really confused, but at the same time, I am really curious to look into myself (including my own brain, lol!) even more!

こんにちは、シャイアです。今日も私のお部屋にお越し頂きましてありがとうございます♪

さて、本家『新ベスのブログ』でようやく💦【ELB-7:生まれ変わり/次元操作、part 1】の英訳版が発表されました。これまでの英訳版もそうですが、実は英訳の時に日本語オリジナルでの少々分かり難かった内容の補足や修正、書き換えをしている箇所がチラホラあります。今回は、『縄文人と縄文系の違い』がちょっと目玉wアイテムです。この英訳の為にわざわざ『Jomonean=縄文系』という造語まで作ってw説明を入れました。興味ある方は、英訳版のQ&Aセクションの半ばくらいに出てくる説明を読んでみて下さい。

実はこの英訳プロジェクトを始めてから少しずつ「あれ〜⁉️」と思っていたことがあったのですが、今回はそれが顕著💥に出てきて少し引き気味💧でした。と言いますのも、自分が普通にピンときて使おうとする英語フレーズが辞書で見てみると度々、しょっちゅう『<古>英語』って出てくるのです!古いってどーゆーこと?!ご存知の方はご承知のように、リアル私は基本日本生まれの日本語ネイティブで、米国に四半世紀在住している、つまり私が普段使う英語は120%現代米語🇺🇸・・・のハズ!ですよね。

ところが、イディオムなどの慣用句、自分がすんなりくるフレーズを見てみると、やたらと『英国英語』とか『古英語(こちらが一例です)』って出てくるのです〜😥おかしいなぁ〜、私は普通に使っているつもりだったのになぁ〜・・・で今回は特にそういう『古』が連発していたのですね。

[ここから完全?オリジナル路線ですw]

ELBの英訳は、通常担当講師であるランバート先生がレビューして、私の英訳質問に回答下さったり、単語の提案などのチェックをして頂いています。細かな文法チェックまでは入れませんので、仮にこれを出版するような事があれば、英語ネイティブの文法チェックを入れないといけませんが、普通に読む分にはとりあえず問題はなかろう(と思いたいww)という感じです。先生の鋭いチェックに関しては、こちらのアメブロ記事(今読むと懐かしいww)が参考になるかと思います:

英訳でのチェック、Vol. 1

英訳でのチェック、Vol. 2

さて今回、ELB-7の英訳が終わってBさん&先生方に報告しました。はい、上記のように「今回はやたら『古英語』が出てきて〜」と書いていましたら、アロムさんから「シャンバラ英語じゃないの、それw」というツッコミが入りました💦

シャンバラ英語は、割と古い表現の英語が多いそうで、英語の前の公式言語だったドイツ語も、現代の表現ではなく古いフレーズがメインだったようです。アロムさん自身も、米国で最初はその言い回しを笑われた事もあるそうです。「君も郷に入っては郷に従え〜だよね」・・・ちょ、ちょ、待てぃ!!💥

いえね、確かにシャンバラで英語のスピーキング・レッスン(主に英国英語)を受けて(リアル就寝中💤)、実際リアルの職場同僚に英国風アクセントwを指摘されたことはあるのです。ですが、私がシャンバラにいる時は(知覚がアヤフヤなのもありますが)、会話は主にテレパシーで日本語&英語を取り混ぜて〜のつもりだったのです。その英語も、自分が普段使っているアメリカーンな米語🇺🇸のつもり・・・だったのですが💧

SH「こんな表現(上に挙げた一例ですね)とか、私普通だと思ってたんですけど・・・」

AR「ああ、それそれ、もう間違いない😁」←シャンバラ英語、ケテーーイ🎉

シャンバラの影響が、まさかこんなところで出てくるとは、恐るべし😰

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: